Hewlett-Packard and Intel 10-Year Pentium 4 Litigation

It took 10 years and undisclosed amount of money for legal expenses, but Hewlett-Packard and Intel certainly think it was worth it.

In the end, the only losers are customers.

A proposed settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit alleging that Intel manipulated the performance benchmark scores for its first-generation Pentium 4 processors and that HP aided and abetted Intel's allegedly unlawful conduct. Intel and HP deny any liability and all claims of misconduct and Intel contends that the performance benchmarks challenged by Plaintiffs fairly measured the performance of the Pentium 4 processor.

You may be eligible for $15 cash if you bought a computer with a Pentium 4 processor between November 20, 2000 and June 30, 2002:

a) All residents of the United States, other than Illinois residents, who
(i) purchased a new computer equipped with a Pentium 4 processor,
(ii) purchased the computer between November 20, 2000 and December 31, 2001,
and
(iii) purchased the computer for personal, family, or household use; and

b) All residents of the United States, other than Illinois residents, who
(i) purchased a new computer equipped with a first-generation (Willamette)
Pentium 4 processor or a Pentium 4 processor at speeds below 2.0 GHz,
(ii) purchased the computer between January 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002, and
(iii) purchased the computer for personal, family, or household use.

c) Excluded from the Class are Intel's current and former directors and
officers; Intel's current employees and its employees during the Class
Period; Intel's legal representatives; and any Judge to whom the litigation
is assigned and the members of his or her immediate family.
More details in: Pentium 4 litigation